Review: The Withdrawal Method

The Withdrawal Method was one of those books that I had seen all over the place. A good word about it here, a positive review there and it was on the Scotiabank Giller Prize Longlist in 2008. Besides, while the title was somewhat off-putting, the cover grabbed my attention. So when I saw it sitting on the shelf in the library, I took the opportunity to check it out.

Now I admit, I don’t generally turn to short stories as my first choice in reading material, so perhaps my knowledge of the structure of the short story is lacking. But I do know what I like, and what I find works, and this collection just didn’t work for me.

The stories are not in any way linked. Indeed, they vary wildly in length, setting and tone. Generally, they involve unlikeable characters making questionable choices. I found the first two stories, The Slough and Big City Girls so repulsive that I nearly quit reading. In the first story, The Slough, the main character, Pasha (a device that I personally despise – naming a character after yourself. It’s a wee bit meta when really there’s no need) dreams of his girlfriend shedding her skin, as if she were a snake. In reality, she is in the hospital dying of skin cancer, and their relationship, prior to her diagnosis, was all but over. Needless to say, his behaviour is reprehensible. In the second story, Big City Girls, Ginny and Alex are school-aged siblings who have a snow day off of school and are stuck in their rural house, unsupervised as their mother watches television in her room. Ginny has invited over three friends from school, and before long the girls have engaged Ginny’s younger brother Alex in a imaginary sex game that quickly goes very wrong. It’s a terribly uncomfortable story to read, and I came away wondering precisely what the point of it was, apart from reminding us, the reader, that children take in more than we remember sometimes, and wield that knowledge dangerously at times.

After that inauspicious beginning, I very nearly left the book unfinished, but quickly came to the two best stories in the book. In the story Pushing Oceans In and Pulling Oceans Out we see the inside dialogue of an unnamed nine-year old girl who is coping with the death of her mother, a grieving father and a developmentally-delayed brother, and is forced to grow up far too quickly. In the story Long Short Short Long we meet Bogdan, a young immigrant boy who has been bullied by the class princess Trish. After Bogdan mistakenly thinks that his music teacher, Miss, is sending him Morse Code messages, Bogdan finally stands up for himself, with stunning consequences. Both of these stories rested heavily on the interior dialogue of the main character(s), and I found that in both of them (particularly Pushing Oceans In and Pulling Oceans Out) Malla believably and convincingly writes a child narrator, not always an easy task.

Unfortunately, many of these stories, while brief enough, seemed to meander pointlessly. At the end of several stories I came away wondering precisely what the point was. And while I believe that not ever story must have a point that is explicitly stated, I feel that I should be able to come away from any book or story that I read with a basic understanding of the author’s intention (or, that I could discern the intention on a re-read). I didn’t get that impression at the end of this book. I suppose it could be said that the prevailing theme of these stories are individuals who have withdrawn – from their relationship, from society, from family. But if that were so, should there not be some redeeming quality in the characters actions or behaviour, or is the point that those who withdraw are doomed? Because of the lack of this redemptive quality, I found the majority of this book terribly depressing, and came to resent picking it up. I think that is why I found the two stories, Pushing Oceans In and Pulling Oceans Out and Long Short Short Long to be the two best stories, as there is a sense of closure and even hope in those two stories that is missing from the majority of the other stories. My grade is based on the strength of these two stories.

Rating: C-

Details:
The Withdrawal Method by Pasha Malla
House of Anansi Press, 2008
Paperback, 321 pages
Review from library copy

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