Review: Sunflowers: A Novel of Vincent Van Gogh

I saw this book ages ago, and the cover grabbed me immediately. However, like so many books, every time I went to pick it up some other book ended up taking priority. Fortunately for me, I found a brand new copy of it on my library shelf not long ago.

Sunflowers, by first-time author Sheramy Bundrick, is the story of Vincent Van Gogh’s time in Arles, France. It begins when Rachel, a local brothel prostitute, escapes to a nearby park one afternoon and falls asleep in the garden. She awakens to find Van Gogh sketching her and shortly after, Van Gogh visits the brothel and strikes up a relationship Rachel. Their relationship is an intense one, and both of them find some of the peace and happiness they are searching for until terrible events threaten their happiness.

I don’t feel I can say too much about these events, but if you have a basic knowledge of Van Gogh (or quickly peruse Van Gogh’s Wikipedia page), you will know that his time in Arles, and his story, do not end well. You will also know that the character of Rachel is more or less fictional. Even knowing the outcome of the book and that Rachel is not necessarily real does not make this book any less of an enjoyable read.

Bundrick, who is an art historian and professor, has a wonderful grasp of Van Gogh’s paintings, and her imagining of the events surrounding the painting of each picture is like reading a beautiful story about each one, even if it may not necessarily be true. She covers many of his paintings, including some of his more famous paintings such as Sunflowers, Starry Night over the Rhône (my personal favorite) and Night Café in the Place Lamartine.

I had imagined his paintings to be sweet and calm and gentle, like he was with me. Not sinister and brooding like this. Bright colors shouted from the canvas – red walls, green ceiling, yellow floor – yet the mood in his café scene was anything but bright. The clock in th background read ten minutes after midnight, and most customers had gone home. Empty chairs and mostly empty glasses said they’d been there, but only dregs of absinthe and the dregs of society remained. Faceless figured hunched over tables; a pimp chatted up a whore. The billiard table sat ready, but no one was playing. Monsieur Ginoux stood there instead, staring out from the painting, and the gaslamps overhead watched too like unblinking eyes. The gay pink bouquet on the sideboard struck the only note of innocence, the only note of hope.

Sunflowers, page 29

Night Café in the Place Lamartine

The story is not without its problems. The entire book is told from Rachel’s first-person perspective. While this allows Bundrick to avoid certain muddy areas (for example this allows her to avoid entirely the difficulty of ascribing intent to certain key events) it does make for some rough writing at times. Later in the book Van Gogh leaves Arles for an extended time and Bundrick has to resort to a series of letters exchanged between Rachel and Van Gogh to fill us in on what happens to him. While seeing Van Gogh through Rachel’s eyes and his interactions with her is interesting, there are far too many times in the book where I found myself wanting to know less about Rachel and her life in the brothel and more about Van Gogh. This is actually a compliment to Bundrick’s, as her depiction of Van Gogh is so compassionate that I wanted to spend more time with him, “watching” him paint and seeing the beauty of the world through his eyes.

Starry Night Over the Rhône

Sunflowers was an interesting historical fiction read, and much better than so much of the historical fiction out there (and certainly it is nice to read some solid historical fiction that is not set in Tudor-era England). Bundrick is so good at describing the setting and people and social structure of late-nineteenth century Arles, describing it so richly that you could almost paint a picture from her words. (As an aside, Bundrick also includes a detailed Author’s Note describing changes and events that she moved around. Personally, I like and appreciate when the author acknowledges that they have fiddled with some of the historical details and where they have done so. She also includes a detailed list of the paintings she mentions and information about some of the key locations. All of this further led to my understanding of the time and place.) Most importantly, Bundrick’s description of Van Gogh lingered long after I ended the book – I felt terribly sad for this talented yet troubled man, and wished to know more about both his life and his paintings. Despite some small issues with the structure of the book, the fact that it stayed with me meant that I found the book to be an overall success.

Rating: B+

Details:
Sunflowers by Sheramy Bundrick
Avon, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers, 2009
Paperback, 401 pages
Reviewed from library copy

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